Welcome to migrationsrecht.eu!

For the latest news on German and EU immigration and asylum law

Migrationsrecht.eu is dedicated to reporting on the latest developments in European and German immigration and asylum law. Interest in German immigration and asylum policies outside of Germany has steadily been increasing ever since the recent influx of asylum-seekers and migrants into Germany and Europe began in 2015.

Our objective is to inform legal professionals from other EU countries as well as English-speaking foreigners living in Germany about the German government’s recent policy changes and the recent decisions made by the German courts, which address important legal issues affecting migrants and asylum-seekers. As Germany is bound to uphold EU law, the legal landscape is also subject to ongoing changes taking place at the European level, such as new EU directives and rulings issued by the Court of Justice of the European Union.

The migrationsrecht.eu team looks forward to keeping you informed of these developments as well as those taking place on a national level in Germany.

The future of Germany as a business location depends to a large extent on how well it is possible to secure and expand the skilled labor base of companies and enterprises. Prosperity, the stability of social security systems and the associated social cohesion, as essential elements of the social market economy, are closely linked to the strength of the economy. The aim is to maintain and expand this strength in the future by providing good framework conditions and a forward-looking skilled workforce.

On 21 August 2018, the Federal Administrative Court in Leipzig decided that the deportation of a foreigner is not illegal even if a decision has not been previously made about how long the foreigner’s entry ban into Germany will last. The fact that a decision has not been made also does not prevent the government from imposing deportation costs on the foreigner concerned. Furthermore, the Federal Administrative Court clarified once again that under EU law, a ban on entry and residence always requires an official or judicial case-by-case decision and cannot be automatically imposed.